(KLIX) – Gov. Brad Little signed new service dog legislation that amends current law.

Among other things, Senate Bill 1075 clarifies terminology about what a service dog is and what a service dog is not.

It is important legislation because many people depend on service dogs on a daily basis, said Rep. Muffy Davis, D-Hailey.

“For many people having a service dog is not an option,” she said in a statement. “It’s something that is necessary for a quality life. We have to make sure our laws can properly address that need.”

The bill explains that public places should “modify its policies, practices, or procedures to permit the use of a service dog by an individual with a disability or an authorized handler,” but noting exceptions may be made if a “service dog is out of control and the service dog's handler does not take effective action to control it,” or the dog “is not housebroken.”

The legislation also is a means to address the shortage of trained service dogs by giving individuals with disabilities the same ability to train a dog as a trainer or organization. Davis said she viewed training restrictions under the current law as discriminatory.

“This new law will allow individuals with disabilities to help increase the number of service dogs available,” she said. “It is important that we take every step possible to enable people to become empowered and independent through service dogs.”