This really isn’t a matter of choice.  Since the death of George Floyd last year in Minnesota, there have been calls from some political leaders to have all the nation’s law enforcers equipped with body cameras when they’re on the streets.  Since most offices and departments receive federal grants for enforcement and programs, refusal would mean the loss of grant money.  Which would then go elsewhere but still be paid for by local taxpayers.

Since most offices and departments receive federal grants for enforcement and programs, refusal would mean the loss of grant money.

Captain Scott Bishop with the Twin Falls County Sheriff’s Office is tasked with finding the right system and at the right cost for the county.

There are a number of factors involved.  The cameras first must be durable.  Law enforcement works in all conditions.  Rain and snow and on water, land and in the air.  Sometimes there is a need to wrestle someone not cooperating with an investigation.  Cameras get knocked to the ground, sometimes run over and sometimes wet.

Bishop wants some input from the public before a system is chosen.  He’s planning a presentation at County West in April.  That’s the old hospital building in Twin Falls.  You can get those details by listening to the YouTube video below.  He explains there are multiple stakeholders.  Deputies, taxpayers and even the Twin Falls County Commission.

Commissioners will eventually approve the expenditure.

Cameras have a dual purpose.  They can assist when it comes to evidence collection.  Additionally, it’s a good way for the Sheriff’s Office to review training in practice.

Modern law enforcement is aided by new technologies that didn’t even exit 20 years ago.

KEEP READING: See changes enacted since George Floyd’s death