American ingenuity mixed with capitalism is a wonderful thing!  An Idaho woman has taken a joke about President Biden and Mainstream media and turned it around.  If you’ve got cattle, you’ll enjoy the T-shirts she’s producing.  Heck, you don’t even need to farm or ranch to get a chuckle out of these!

Let's go Brandin'

I’ve been working in media of one sort or another for 35 years.  This is one of the cleverest twists I’ve seen on a story that began with some very crass and dirty words.  Then it morphed into something cleaner after a sportscaster at a NASCAR race intentionally (or not!) tried cleaning up the original chant.  She was interviewing a driver named Brandon, if you recall, and excitedly told the young man the crowd was cheering his name.

It’s like saying heck or dang.  An old school teacher would say “gold darn”.  Eric “Hoss” Cartwright chose “dad blame”.  When I was a little boy, I watched my Grandma Gordon make sausage.  Something went awry.  “Fiddlesticks,” she shouted.  So you see, we’ve been cleaning up language for a very long time.

The shirts are made by a woman named Anne Marie.  You can order them by calling 208-490-2306.  Or drop her an email at canchasor@gmail.com.

Great Gift Idea

I believe these will make great Christmas presents and you can shop locally!

There are days when I ask myself why I never come up with these great ideas.  I’m not jealous, I’m simply admitting I’m not always quick on my feet.  I’ve got great admiration for people with creative abilities.

Buy some shirts.  Have some fun!  You won’t hurt the President’s feelings.  He claims he applied for a job in Idaho when he was young because he was captured by the culture and beauty of the state.  Nobody remembers his application and a week after he made the claim his memory was also probably gone.

LOOK: The top holiday toys from the year you were born

With the holiday spirit in the air, it’s the perfect time to dive into the history of iconic holiday gifts. Using national toy archives and data curated by The Strong from 1920 to today, Stacker searched for products that caught hold of the public zeitgeist through novelty, innovation, kitsch, quirk, or simply great timing, and then rocketed to success.

LOOK: Things from the year you were born that don't exist anymore

The iconic (and at times silly) toys, technologies, and electronics have been usurped since their grand entrance, either by advances in technology or breakthroughs in common sense. See how many things on this list trigger childhood memories—and which ones were here and gone so fast you missed them entirely.