What we today call Veterans Day has its origins 101 years ago.  World War One ended, November 11th, 1918.  My mother taught me “at the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month”.  The words are still haunting.  Armistice Day eventually became Remembrance Day throughout the English-speaking world and in the United States it would become Veterans Day.

North of the border it combines our Veterans Day and Memorial Day. 

In many ways, they’re the Keepers of our Cultural Flame.  They should be venerated.  And we should listen.

The keynote speaker at this year’s ceremony in Twin Falls was County Prosecuting Attorney Grant Loebs.  A grandfather served in World War Two and in Korea at the rank of Colonel.  Mr. Loebs’ father also served during the Korean War.  The Prosecutor reviewed the history of the day and the number of men and women from Twin Falls County who’ve served in uniform since World War One.  For a rural county, the number is large.

More than 100 children sang America (My Country Tis of Thee) at the event at City Park.  There was a large contingent of local clergy and pastors in attendance.

The closing prayer was offered by the former Chair of the Twin Falls County Democrats, Linda Brugger.  She’s a veteran.  She spoke of the need to address PTSD among returning servicemen and women.

This weekend, a pancake breakfast is scheduled at County West.  It begins at 9 o’clock in the morning and ends at noon.  Veterans will be serving breakfast at the Veterans Center.

As an aside, there is something bittersweet about Veterans Day.  With a sunny sky and seasonable temperatures, it was a lovely moment for a tribute and, yet.  The cool breeze and the leaves shuffling across the grass remind us many of our finest depart every year.  In many ways, they’re the Keepers of our Cultural Flame.  They should be venerated.  And we should listen.