Let's be honest here. If I ask you to think of a Thanksgiving dinner, you're going to imagine a turkey with a bunch of side dishes. Even if you don't like turkey, that's the image most of us have. Even a Google search of 'Thanksgiving Dinner' shows a turkey in every single picture.

What Does A Thanksgiving Meal Look Like

So, how in the world can Idahoans say that they don't like turkey? That's according to the number of Twitter posts from Idaho that state 'I hate turkey'. The She Knows website shows that cranberry sauce is the most hated dish at Thanksgiving dinner in 17 states. Idaho's most searched-for savory dish, the green bean casserole, is the second most hated dish in 12 states. But the Thanksgiving staple, turkey, is somehow a hated Thanksgiving dish in Idaho, Oregon, and Maine.

How Important Is Turkey At Thanksgiving

I like turkey and cranberry sauce so I can't relate to the results of this study. In my book, green bean casserole would be the most hated dish followed by sweet potatoes and stuffing. I do get that people prefer to have ham or some other meat for the main dish. Though in our recent survey nearly 90 percent of you said that you prefer turkey for your Thanksgiving meal.

If you are taking on the task of cooking a turkey check out our list of essentials for the perfect turkey including when you should start thawing it. You can also consult the Butterball Turkey hotline of you have any prep questions. If you are choosing to eat at a restaurant in Twin Falls rather than cook at home, there are a few restaurants hosting Thanksgiving dinners.

Check out the Evolution of the Starbucks Holiday Cups Over Their First 20 Years

The 2015 "War on Christmas" cups may be the most famous, but the 2016 cup had a special Idaho connection! Scroll through to see how they linked back to the Gem State!

LOOK: The top holiday toys from the year you were born

With the holiday spirit in the air, it’s the perfect time to dive into the history of iconic holiday gifts. Using national toy archives and data curated by The Strong from 1920 to today, Stacker searched for products that caught hold of the public zeitgeist through novelty, innovation, kitsch, quirk, or simply great timing, and then rocketed to success.

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